freakishlyawesomestuff:

Did you know there is a monument to lab rats used for DNA research.

freakishlyawesomestuff:

Did you know there is a monument to lab rats used for DNA research.

beatonna:

These kids are amazing, they nailed iiitttt.  My science classes were never this cool (except when Ms. Hunt took us on field trips! I can still identify all that lichen, Ms. Hunt).

Some really great things come out around Ada Lovelace Day every year, no?  

sciencecenter:

#Overlyhonestmethods

I’m doing my senior research right now, and I swear that the Experimental sections of the papers I read were written with a Magic 8 Ball. There are plenty more memes if you click through. And feel free to make your own and sent it my way!

h/t Chas

archiemcphee:

Psychiatrist Dr Karen Norberg, of the National Bureau of Economic Research in Cambridge, Massachusetts knitted this awesome, anatomically correct replica of the human brain. 

Using different colour to represent different parts of the brain, it took Dr. Norberg one year to complete her project. She used yarn because she thought “the wool lent itself to creating the right “rippling” effect for parts of the brain and was easier to manipulate than other materials.”

The frontal cortex is cream and pale green, the visual cortex a mix of blue, purple and turquoise while the hippocampus is made up of baby pink wool. The two sides of the nine inch brain - one and a half times life size - are joined together by a zip with the cerebellum knitted in blue and spinal cord trailing off in white strands of wool.

According to Dr Norberg the project was a labour of love:

“For me, there were two humorous aspects. One was simply to undertake such a ridiculously complex, time consuming project for no practical reason. The second was the idea of making a somewhat mysterious and difficult object - a brain - out of a ‘cuddly’, cheerfully coloured, familiar material like cotton yarn.”

The wonderful woolly brain is currently on display at the Boston Museum of Science. 

Click here to view a much larger version of the second image.

[via Geeks are Sexy and Telegraph.co.uk]

Time for a trip to the Museum of Science!

searchingforknowledge:

urbandejavu:


al-monitor: 
“Tired of darkness” from the country’s frequent power outages, a team of teenage girls has developed solar-powered appliances and now sells them across Yemen, writes Nafeesa Syeed for Al-Monitor:

“In Yemen, we have abundant sun,” says Reem Rashed, 16, who works in the company’s human resources section. “We need to exploit solar power because it’s a favorable, free energy and it does no damage to Yemeni society.”
Pictured above: Wafa Al-Rimi, the 16-year-old CEO of the student-run company, Creative Generation in Yemen. 

YESSSSSSSSSSSSS

searchingforknowledge:

urbandejavu:

al-monitor

Tired of darkness” from the country’s frequent power outages, a team of teenage girls has developed solar-powered appliances and now sells them across Yemen, writes Nafeesa Syeed for Al-Monitor:

“In Yemen, we have abundant sun,” says Reem Rashed, 16, who works in the company’s human resources section. “We need to exploit solar power because it’s a favorable, free energy and it does no damage to Yemeni society.”

Pictured above: Wafa Al-Rimi, the 16-year-old CEO of the student-run company, Creative Generation in Yemen. 

YESSSSSSSSSSSSS

scinerds:

Is light made of waves, or particles?
This fundamental question has dogged scientists for decades, because light seems to be both. However, until now, experiments have revealed light to act either like a particle, or a wave, but never the two at once.
Now, for the first time, a new type of experiment has shown light behaving like both a particle and a wave simultaneously, providing a new dimension to the quandary that could help reveal the true nature of light, and of the whole quantum world.
The debate goes back at least as far as Isaac Newton, who advocated that light was made of particles, and James Clerk Maxwell, whose successful theory of electromagnetism, unifying the forces of electricity and magnetism into one, relied on a model of light as a wave. Then in 1905, Albert Einstein explained a phenomenon called the photoelectric effect using the idea that light was made of particles called photons (this discovery won him the Nobel Prize in physics).
Ultimately, there’s good reason to think that light is both a particle and a wave. In fact, the same seems to be true of all subatomic particles, including electrons and quarks and even the recently discovered Higgs boson-like particle. The idea is called wave-particle duality, and is a fundamental tenet of the theory of quantum mechanics.
Depending on which type of experiment is used, light, or any other type of particle, will behave like a particle or like a wave. So far, both aspects of light’s nature haven’t been observed at the same time.
Now, for the first time, researchers have devised a new type of measurement apparatus that can detect both particle and wave-like behavior at the same time. The device relies on a strange quantum effect called quantum nonlocality, a counter-intuitive notion that boils down to the idea that the same particle can exist in two locations at once.
“The measurement apparatus detected strong nonlocality, which certified that the photon behaved simultaneously as a wave and a particle in our experiment,” physicist Alberto Peruzzo of England’s University of Bristol said in a statement. “This represents a strong refutation of models in which the photon is either a wave or a particle.”
Peruzzo is lead author of a paper describing the experiment published in the Nov. 2 issue of the journal Science.

scinerds:

Is light made of waves, or particles?

This fundamental question has dogged scientists for decades, because light seems to be both. However, until now, experiments have revealed light to act either like a particle, or a wave, but never the two at once.

Now, for the first time, a new type of experiment has shown light behaving like both a particle and a wave simultaneously, providing a new dimension to the quandary that could help reveal the true nature of light, and of the whole quantum world.

The debate goes back at least as far as Isaac Newton, who advocated that light was made of particles, and James Clerk Maxwell, whose successful theory of electromagnetism, unifying the forces of electricity and magnetism into one, relied on a model of light as a wave. Then in 1905, Albert Einstein explained a phenomenon called the photoelectric effect using the idea that light was made of particles called photons (this discovery won him the Nobel Prize in physics).

Ultimately, there’s good reason to think that light is both a particle and a wave. In fact, the same seems to be true of all subatomic particles, including electrons and quarks and even the recently discovered Higgs boson-like particle. The idea is called wave-particle duality, and is a fundamental tenet of the theory of quantum mechanics.

Depending on which type of experiment is used, light, or any other type of particle, will behave like a particle or like a wave. So far, both aspects of light’s nature haven’t been observed at the same time.

Now, for the first time, researchers have devised a new type of measurement apparatus that can detect both particle and wave-like behavior at the same time. The device relies on a strange quantum effect called quantum nonlocality, a counter-intuitive notion that boils down to the idea that the same particle can exist in two locations at once.

“The measurement apparatus detected strong nonlocality, which certified that the photon behaved simultaneously as a wave and a particle in our experiment,” physicist Alberto Peruzzo of England’s University of Bristol said in a statement. “This represents a strong refutation of models in which the photon is either a wave or a particle.”

Peruzzo is lead author of a paper describing the experiment published in the Nov. 2 issue of the journal Science.

sciencecenter:

Absurd Avian Activities: Anting
The bird pictured above seems to just be chilling out, doing it’s bird thang, but take my word for it, it’s doing something strange indeed. It’s sitting on an anthill and allowing ants to crawl all over it. Even better, it might gobble up dozens of ants, and then smear ant paste all over itself. Here’s a video of it happening. Scientists call the phenomenon “anting.” But why do birds do it?
Experts have a few theories as to why birds ‘ant’. One theory says that crushed ants work like a cheap, easy insect repellant for birds - the natural chemical inside of ants defend against insects and also fungi. Alternatively, birds often apply ant paste during molting season, hinting that the crushed ants might act like bath oils, soothing the skin. One scientist compared anting to humans smoking a cigarette to relax; to take that analogy even further, some scientists even claim that birds can become addicted to anting. 
Quick Links
Animals who love to rub themselves with ants. Is this addictve? - NPR Science
Anting in Singapore Birds
Anting Bird - Youtube

sciencecenter:

Absurd Avian Activities: Anting

The bird pictured above seems to just be chilling out, doing it’s bird thang, but take my word for it, it’s doing something strange indeed. It’s sitting on an anthill and allowing ants to crawl all over it. Even better, it might gobble up dozens of ants, and then smear ant paste all over itself. Here’s a video of it happening. Scientists call the phenomenon “anting.” But why do birds do it?

Experts have a few theories as to why birds ‘ant’. One theory says that crushed ants work like a cheap, easy insect repellant for birds - the natural chemical inside of ants defend against insects and also fungi. Alternatively, birds often apply ant paste during molting season, hinting that the crushed ants might act like bath oils, soothing the skin. One scientist compared anting to humans smoking a cigarette to relax; to take that analogy even further, some scientists even claim that birds can become addicted to anting. 

Quick Links

scishow:

leontong:

There’s this place in Ireland where every 2 years, the stars line up with this trail on June 10th-June 18th.  It’s called the Heaven’s Trail.

I hate to burst everyone’s bubble here, but I can count five reasons miniumum why this is impossible.
If a stellar alignment occurs at all, it occurs a minimum of once per year. It cannot occur every two years. In fact, they almost always occur twice per year, the only stellar alignments that truly occur only once per year are the solstices.
If this occurs from June 10th to June 18th, it would also occur on June 22nd to June 30th, because, after the summer solstice, the stars repeat their patterns in reverse.
Ireland is substantially in the northern hemisphere. For the milky way to be straight up and down like this in June, it would have to be very near the equator. 
There’s also no way to see stars so near the horizon especially with clouds in the air. So this is, at the very least, a composite of two photographs.
The caption says it’s in Ireland, but it isn’t raining *BURN*
The world is intensely wonderful and beautiful and we don’t need to make stuff up…though I have nothing against fantasy, I do dislike bad science.

Thanks, Hank! 

Bad astronomy FTL.

scishow:

leontong:

There’s this place in Ireland where every 2 years, the stars line up with this trail on June 10th-June 18th.  It’s called the Heaven’s Trail.

I hate to burst everyone’s bubble here, but I can count five reasons miniumum why this is impossible.

  1. If a stellar alignment occurs at all, it occurs a minimum of once per year. It cannot occur every two years. In fact, they almost always occur twice per year, the only stellar alignments that truly occur only once per year are the solstices.
  2. If this occurs from June 10th to June 18th, it would also occur on June 22nd to June 30th, because, after the summer solstice, the stars repeat their patterns in reverse.
  3. Ireland is substantially in the northern hemisphere. For the milky way to be straight up and down like this in June, it would have to be very near the equator. 
  4. There’s also no way to see stars so near the horizon especially with clouds in the air. So this is, at the very least, a composite of two photographs.
  5. The caption says it’s in Ireland, but it isn’t raining *BURN*

The world is intensely wonderful and beautiful and we don’t need to make stuff up…though I have nothing against fantasy, I do dislike bad science.

Thanks, Hank! 

Bad astronomy FTL.

(Source: thisonedoglover)

scishow:

Hank brings us the strange story of in vitro meat - muscle tissue grown in laboratories with the hope that someday we will eat it.

Very cool! This is probably the only time PETA and I have agreed on something: they’re offering $1 million reward to the first scientist to create in vitro chicken that’s cheap enough to bring to market. Even if that money will come from unethical business practices and literally murdering puppies…

In case you were wondering why I was all

the other day:

effyeahnerdfighters:

The Higgs Boson

In which Hank takes a few minutes out of his busy vacation to talk about the Higgs boson, the Higgs field, and what they mean. We know a remarkable amount about this universe, but as of this week, we officially know a lot more. It’s pretty freaking exciting, and I’m very pleased that our world is still committed to this kind of pure science and discovery.

seitanslayer:

atheist-overdose:

Actually happened follow for the best atheist posts on tumblr

HOW DID SHE KNOW??

Deal with it.

seitanslayer:

atheist-overdose:

Actually happened

HOW DID SHE KNOW??

Deal with it.